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OUR TOP THREE TIPS

1. EXPLAIN THE SCIENCE OF YOUR SHOW OFF CLEARLY AND ACCURATELY

Think of a science demonstration that you could do. Identify the science area, or topic, that relates to what you are doing. For example, if you are demonstrating changes and reactions caused by mixing substances, you are doing chemistry. Or, if you are dealing with energy and forces, seen during sports or playing music, your topic is physics.

Before recording your video, make sure you have prepared and researched your topic so you can explain the concepts simply and accurately.

During your presentation, let your audience know what area of science you are communicating, as this helps to put your demonstration in context. It is very important that you focus on explaining the scientific principles that you are demonstrating.

2. TELL A STORY AND INSPIRE PEOPLE

Science helps us to generate solutions and provide answers in everyday life to some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The challenge for this competition is to communicate that knowledge to others in an engaging way, so they feel inspired or can understand a new idea.

As a scientist, it is always important to relate to your audience, to put yourself in their shoes, and to think about how to help them understand what you’re showing them. Creating a story that is relevant to different ages, from young kids to adults, is a great way of doing this.

When you are presenting your demos, tell a story using real world references, and give examples showing how the science behind your demonstration can be used to solve problems. Put in extra effort to make your Show Off memorable and meaningful.

3. PLAN, PREPARE, PRACTICE, PERFECT!

Rehearse your presentation in advance. We encourage you to write a script to help you remember all the points you want to make. Make sure you have an introduction that explains your topic and what you’re going to do, a middle where you explain what’s going on, and a clear conclusion. It is useful to have some key information you would like to highlight, such as some interesting facts and real world examples, and include them in your presentation.

Practice what you are going to say, in front of the mirror and in front of people. Remember to change the tone, volume, and pitch of your voice to keep the audience engaged. Be energetic, and use eye contact to connect with your viewers – when you record, this means looking straight at the camera lens.

You can also use a wide range of visual aids, like props, pictures, or graphs, to highlight and support your key points.

Getting feedback from friends and family will help you improve your presentation before recording the final version of your video.