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Blog

The blog is where we'll post news, updates, information about objects in our collection, #betterworkstories, profiles of staff members and visitors, pictures and videos, and really anything we think you'd find interesting. We hope you enjoy. 

If there's a topic you'd like us to do a post about, or a post that you think needs a sequel, just let us know!

1. Moth composite

Ahi Pepe goes to Whanganui

Words and photos by Kane Fleury, Assistant Curator, Natural Science

Recently I represented the Museum at the Ahi Pepe MothNet North Island moth camp that was hosted by Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Atihaunui ā Pāpārangi and Putiki Marae in Whanganui. I was there alongside representatives from other partners Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, Ngāi Tahu, and Orokanui Ecosanctuary, Te Tumu and the geography departments from the University of Otago. The kids from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti also came along so that they could teach the other kura what they have learnt from being part of Ahi Pepe...

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Milestone met for moth project at Otago Museum

The Otago Museum, in collaboration with Landcare Research, is in the middle of a significant moth data collection project, working towards painting a broad picture of its expansive moth collection. The Museum holds one of New Zealand’s most accurately documented and regionally comprehensive collections of moths, assembled by former Otago Museum Collections and Research Manager Brian Patrick. Each moth within this collection has been named, and each record includes data on where it was collected, when and by whom. The project will capture and digitise the data of over 23,000 specimens including three families of moth – Ghost moths (Hepialidae), Geometer moths (Geometridae) and Owlet moths (Noctuidae). Late last month, the project team celebrated...

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He Taoka o te Rā (Object of the Day)

Āwheto refers to both caterpillars and the vegetable like state of a caterpillar that has been infected by a parasitic fungus used by early Māori as pigment for tā moko, traditional tattooing.

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About

Our blog aims to keep you informed of the latest happenings at the Otago Museum, through posts about our collections, our people and our work.

Disclaimer

The views expressed here are those of our individual contributors, and are not the views of the Otago Museum.

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All content of this blog is Copyright Otago Museum, 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the Otago Museum, except for the purposes of private study, research, criticism, review, or education, as provided for in the New Zealand Copyright Act 1994.