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Blog

The blog is where we'll post news, updates, information about objects in our collection, #betterworkstories, profiles of staff members and visitors, pictures and videos, and really anything we think you'd find interesting. We hope you enjoy. 

If there's a topic you'd like us to do a post about, or a post that you think needs a sequel, just let us know!

Grebes John Darby

Great Crested Grebes of Lake Wanaka

Although the great crested grebe (Podiceps cristatus) is a cosmopolitan species, the subspecies found in New Zealand is rare and is confined to the inland lakes of Canterbury and Otago.

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Moira Blog 22

NZ Chinese Language Week – two early 20th century translations

A number of Dunedin men and women served as Christian missionaries and teachers in China in the late 19th and early 20th centuries...

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O50.008

Te Marama Puoro Waiata Māori – Māori Music Month

Music has always been an important component of Māori life – waiata are sung during pōwhiri and other formal ceremonies, as well as to acknowledge events, express emotion and tell stories. In pre-European times...

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A Lot of Zeros

Last month, New Zealanders were told that the annual inflation rate for the second quarter of 2016 had “come in slightly softer than expected… at 0.4%” – a far cry from the experience of Hungary in 1946...

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Milestone met for moth project at Otago Museum

The Otago Museum, in collaboration with Landcare Research, is in the middle of a significant moth data collection project, working towards painting a broad picture of its expansive moth collection. The Museum holds one of New Zealand’s most accurately documented and regionally comprehensive collections of moths, assembled by former Otago Museum Collections and Research Manager Brian Patrick. Each moth within this collection has been named, and each record includes data on where it was collected, when and by whom. The project will capture and digitise the data of over 23,000 specimens including three families of moth – Ghost moths (Hepialidae), Geometer moths (Geometridae) and Owlet moths (Noctuidae). Late last month, the project team celebrated...

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Pokémon Go fever hits Dunedin – What is all the fuss about?

By now you may have heard about the latest digital craze, Pokémon Go, taking the world by storm, and it hasn’t taken long for Dunedin-ites to jump on board.  

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HE TAOKA O TE RĀ (OBJECT OF THE DAY)

When many of us think of taoka, or treasures, we think of culturally valuable items people have made. Natural taoka are plants, birds and other animals that are important to Māori and have a cultural significance that is sometimes – but not always – related to traditional use of their parts, or to their presence in the local area. 

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HE TAOKA O TE RĀ (OBJECT OF THE DAY)

In Māori mythology, hue (or gourds) are personified by the deity Hinepūtēhue, the youngest daughter of Tāne and Hinerauāmoa. It is said after the separation of Ranginui and Papatuanuku there was terrific fighting amongst their children. 

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HE TAOKA O TE RĀ (OBJECT OF THE DAY)

My mahi in the Museum is financial accounting. Each day as I walk through the Nature gallery to my office I pass familiar taonga – kekeno (New Zealand fur seal), paikea (humpback whale) remains and kōura (crayfish) – that connect me back home to Kaikōura. Before moving to Dunedin I never lived more than a kilometre from the ocean and could either see it, hear it, was on it or in it.

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HE TAOKA O TE RĀ (OBJECT OF THE DAY)

The moa was a flightless bird similar to the emu of Australia and the rhea of South America. They lived exclusively in New Zealand and became extinct about 600 years ago.

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About

Our blog aims to keep you informed of the latest happenings at the Otago Museum, through posts about our collections, our people and our work.

Disclaimer

The views expressed here are those of our individual contributors, and are not the views of the Otago Museum.

Copyright

All content of this blog is Copyright Otago Museum, 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the Otago Museum, except for the purposes of private study, research, criticism, review, or education, as provided for in the New Zealand Copyright Act 1994.

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